Category Archives: System Administration

Setting up WordPress behind Amazon Cloudfront

You all know that feeling (well, I hope you do!) that when a spike in traffic occurs on your WordPress site, that the miniature server you have it running on very quickly runs out of resources. Apache’s good like that. Taking up all the resources with its large number of processes consuming oodles of memory each. How on earth can you possibly fix it, especially when you’re running on a tight budget and upgrading the server for that once-in-a-blue-moon you get a spike in traffic? Well, Amazon Cloudfront to the rescue!

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Making WordPress’s qTranslate plugin work on different domain names

Recently I was handed a WordPress site for a client that used qTranslate for various versions of their website in different languages. The caveat was that each language needed its own domain name, not a subdomain, path or query string of the main one. For sure I could have redirected the welsh domain to the english version with the /cy/ path in it, but I had a better idea. Use nginx. This is utterly genius.

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Fedora 16 to 17 upgrade

I finally had the opportunity to upgrade my laptop from Fedora 16 to 17. When I installed 16 originally, within the week 17 came out, and I was too busy to do anything about it. Granted now 18 is in beta, and is likely to be released tomorrow now that I’ve done this upgrade, I wanted to post about an issue that I came across that no one seems to have touched on much, or at least there’s no real mention of it online. Only by chance did using a couple of tricks combined sort the problem out.

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Amazon EC2 Elastic Load Balancer limit

If, like us, you’re running a shared hosting platform on Amazon EC2, and have many clients requiring SSL certificates, you’ll probably be using Elastic Load Balancers to do the SSL termination for you, since you can’t have multiple Elastic IP’s associated with a single instance.

However, when you reach either 5 or 10 ELB’s, you’ll be greeted with this error message when trying to create another one:

Error: TooManyLoadBalancers: undefined

Amazon define relatively low quotas for new AWS accounts, which are usually fine for most users. However, some use cases apply where you need these limits to be increased. The problem with the ELB limit, is that there’s not very much documentation explaining that there is a limit, nor how to request to increase it. The answer lies hidden away here on Amazon’s AWS site. This is the form you need to fill in to request an increase on the account’s ELB limit.

Amazon Web Services – A Guide to Implementation

I realise that I’ve been neglecting my blog for a while now, with my last post published at the end of March. Quite frankly, I’ve not had anything interesting to write about. However, career starting pastures new, I’m starting to have interesting things to write about again. Over the course of time, I’ll probably post a lot of stuff about Amazon Web Services (AWS), Zend Framework, amongst other things. Today’s babble though is about implementing AWS as your core hosting infrastructure, and the benefits and downsides to it. I’ll also post my findings about the best way (in my opinion) to implement certain requirements.

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